Back to Our Past is Back in Belfast and to the ICC Waterfront!

All talks are free to attend and places are available on a first-come-first-served basis

The organisers would like to thank Martin McDowell of the North of Ireland Family History Society for arranging the programme

Friday 15 February 2019

Time

Subject

Speaker

Organisation

10.30

Getting Started with Family History

Gillian Hunt

Ulster Historical Foundation

Gillian Hunt, Research Officer with the Ulster Historical Foundation, will look at the most helpful sources and websites to use when beginning to research your ancestors including census, civil and church records. She will also share how the Foundation can help you with your family history.

11.30

Not all records are online – try these…

Mike McKeag

North of Ireland Family History Society

Mike McKeag, vice-president of the North of Ireland Family History Society [NIFHS] reveals the contents of its Research Centre in Newtownabbey - a splendid library of over two thousand volumes of family history information. This includes transcriptions of many baptisms, marriages and burials; family trees and family histories; census strays; mourning cards; genealogical correspondence; local history journals; street directories; and maps.  Mike will explain how the Society can help you through personal guidance, a programme of courses and the wider branch network.

12.30

How to trace your ancestors who went to Scotland

Irene O’Brien

Glasgow City Archives

Discover that elusive Irish ancestor in Glasgow’s unrivalled poor law records (1m) dating from 1845.  The talk will describe the Scottish system and the documentation of large numbers of Irish applicants, many born pre-civil registration and some back to the 18th century.  The records add vital genealogical data, recording details of 3 generations of the family, including many staying in Ireland. As well as making these links, they also provide a taste of what life was like for large swathes of the population in Glasgow.

13.30

FamilySearch - Fantastic and Free!

Steve Manning

Federation of Family History Societies

FamilySearch is an incredibly in-depth and totally free-to-use website.  Come and learn of features old and new - and discover why it's a resource you shouldn't neglect on your family history journey. This talk is presented by Steve Manning, Federation of Family History Societies Education Officer and FamilySearch trainer.

14.30

Migration and Family History

Dr. Patrick Fitzgerald

Ulster American Folk Park

Patrick Fitzgerald will discuss what resources are held at the Mellon Centre for Migration Studies and talk about historic migration patterns and how an understanding of these can help the family historian.

15.30

Using PRONI’s Historical Map Viewer

Janet Hancock

Public Records Office of Northern Ireland

Janet Hancock is Deputy Head of Public Services at the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (PRONI), and was project manager for delivery of the Historical Maps Viewer. Janet will demonstrate how you can navigate the maps viewer to uncover the history of particular locations using digitised Ordnance Survey maps, dating from 1832. The presentation will explore the many features of the application. Experienced researchers may pick up some tips and the presentation should also prove a great starting point for new users.

Saturday 16 February 2018

Time

Subject

Speaker

Organisation

10.30

Family search – fantastic  and  free!

Steve Manning

Federation of Family History Societies

FamilySearch is an incredibly in-depth and totally free-to-use website.  Come and learn of features old and new - and discover why it's a resource you shouldn't neglect on your family history journey. This talk is presented by Steve Manning, Federation of Family History Societies Education Officer and FamilySearch trainer.

11.30

History Through Genealogy

Jonathan Gray

Killeeshil & Clonaneese Historical Society

Jonathan Gray, a historian living in south Tyrone, will talk on his experiences of learning history through genealogy and talk from specific examples that have yielded some remarkable results.  He will also speak on the importance of a personal approach to genealogical research and the restrictions of adopting a purely mechanical process.

12.30

An Introduction to GRONI Records

Kathie Walker

General Registry Office of Northern Ireland

Kathie Walker is the Deputy Registrar General in the Northern Ireland General Registry Office.  This talk will explain how the official Birth, Death and Marriage records can be accessed on line and using her own family history Kathie will provide examples of how to search the records and what to look for on the certificates.  Often the certificates lead to other family members or addresses and help break down the brick walls we all have in our journey back in time.

13.30

Using PRONI Valuation Records

Stephen Scarth

Public Records Office of Northern Ireland

Stephen Scarth is Head of Public Services at the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (PRONI), and is responsible for all customer related activities including PRONI’s web content. In the absence of nearly all Irish census records prior to 1901, valuation records, documenting the names of principal tenants and property owners, help fill a significant void. Stephen will demonstrate how you can navigate digitised valuation revision volumes (1868-1930s) in order to identify your ancestors.

14.30

Property Records

Andrew Kane

North of Ireland Family History Society

Discover how property records can be used by the genealogist to trace back into the 17th century. As well as providing the history of a specific property back through the centuries, this can allow the researcher to see what families have lived in a particular location with unbroken occupation, especially useful in an agriculturally based society. In the absence of BMD information, tracing a family by location is often the best avenue open to the genealogist. In relation to Coleraine, Andrew traced the 1622 householders list through the surviving records to Griffiths Valuation. He has done similar work on Ballymoney town and Londonderry city, as well as rural properties, using estate records.

15.30

How to trace your ancestors who went to Scotland

Irene O’Brien

Glasgow City Archives

Discover that elusive Irish ancestor in Glasgow’s unrivalled poor law records (1m) dating from 1845.  The talk will describe the Scottish system and the documentation of large numbers of Irish applicants, many born pre-civil registration and some back to the 18th century.  The records add vital genealogical data, recording details of 3 generations of the family, including many staying in Ireland. As well as making these links, they also provide a taste of what life was like for large swathes of the population in Glasgow.

Schedule for the Genetic Genealogy at Back to Our Past, Belfast 2019